Aid and comfort to the enemy

What is it with German zoos lately? It seems every single cute baby animal story is coming to us from Germany these days, which surprises this blog. If one could pick one culture that seems to be more into torture than cuteness (aside from the U.S.) one would think German culture.

Last week, a tiger cub bit off more than it could chew and started choking on it. A zoo attendant panicked after dislodging the meat but the cub still wasn’t moving. That’s when a medical student gave the tiger cub mouth-to-mouth and ended up saving its life. TRAITOR! You had this one gift wrapped for you. You didn’t even have to kill the cub, just stand there. But no, instead you save the cub’s life so it can grow up and eat you one day.

No mar sonar

Of all the branches of the military, the U.S. Navy is probably the most finicky about just which side it is on in the War on Animals. This really makes no sense, seeing as how the military is supposed to help us fight wars, but nevertheless, there have been some issues with them in the past, including training dolphins and sea lions to protect the country’s shores, like we can really trust the enemy. The Navy has also roughed up yours truly when I tried to get onto the Naval Academy campus hunting a green pigeon.

Last month, President George Bush exempted the Navy from environmental protections, basically saying they could use their sonar whenever they want, even though traitors claim it kills whales–like that’s a bad thing. Before that, the issue had been bounced around in the federal courts. First the Navy could not use sonar because it might harm whales, then the courts said they could use sonar no matter what.

Now, the courts are saying Bush cannot take the steps necessary to keep our oceans free of mammals. That’s right, the Navy is back to no sonar mode. These liberal, critter-loving courts need to get their heads out of the sand and realize there is a war going on. If the courts had it their way, we wouldn’t be able to monitor our enemy’s mating calls, either!

The threat continues to grow

Animals are out there, we all know that. But despite our best efforts to put the ones we know about into extinction, we seem to keep finding new ones. Zoologists announced they have discovered a new mammal in Tanzania, which this blog thinks is somewhere near Australia.

The mammal is something like a shrew and is unusually large. This is bad news for us. When we discover new species, they are supposed to either be a) tasty or b) smaller than similar types. Larger animals only present larger threats because it gets harder to exterminate them using conventional weapons. To properly deal with this threat, this blog thinks it’s time Tanzania got a good, old-fashioned carpet bombing.

Also, paleontologists announced recently they found the fossils of an ancestor of the crocodile. The dinosaur lived in Brazil, likely because it enjoyed the Carnivale festivals. It had a long snout but lived on land. Luckily, the creature died out long ago and no longer poses a threat to us. Also, it is good to learn as much as you can about your enemy, and that includes its history. Hopefully we will discover some kind of weakness of the crocodile, or at least some really embarrassing dirt.

They want to slow our progress

All seems to be fairly quiet right now in the War on Animals. This may be caused by the cold weather, sending our foes into a dormant state, or in some cases, hibernation.

However, in the warmer climates it doesn’t appear to be cold enough for the enemy to stop the fight altogether. In Florida, 20,000 bats have made the underside of twin bridges their home. They are delaying the construction on Interstate 95. While this is probably a passive attempt at slowing down our progress, this does mark a possible change in strategy. They are now going after our infrastructure, we have seen some examples of this in the recent past.

Tech support can’t save Indian reptiles

If someone said to you, “I have a gharial,” you would probably ask if they needed to go to a hospital. However, a gharial is actually a rare crocodile-like reptile found in India, and as it turns out, they are the ones that need a hospital.

Over the weekend, about 50 gharials washed up dead and scientists in India are baffled at the moment. Meanwhile, animal lovers are worried about the animal, since there are an estimated 1,500 of them left in the wild.

This blog is read huge in India, approximately 0.001 percent of the population (4 million) read us there, so this blog has a feeling this was no “accidental” mass killing of a rare reptile. We would like to congratulate the brave warriors who have once again taken the fight back to the animals. Fifty down, 1,450 left to go!