Drinking makes you feel good, science claims

Everyone, stop what you’re doing, take a deep breath and collect yourself. The next sentence is so earth-shattering you will likely never view life the same way again. Beer makes you happy.

Researchers in Germany (of course) have found that a compound in beer called Hordenine activate the dopamine receptors in your brain. Meaning, your brain basically treats the compound as if it were dopamine. Scientists said Hordenine is found in beer because large amounts of it exist in malted barley, a key ingredient in beer.

Ready for some even better news? Barley is also used to make a lot of whiskies, so it seems likely to us that the same compound will be found in the brown stuff, too.

It’s Friday, go out and make yourself happy.

Fighting whisky: Bottle found sealed in decommissioned warship

There’s nothing better in the world than found booze. You either find booze you forgot you had, or find booze that someone else lost track of. And it’s been mellowing the whole time.

A bottle of whisky was found on board an Australian warship, hidden away for 35 years–the bad news is that it’s Canadian whisky. The HMAS Sidney, a frigate in the Royal Australian Navy since 1982, is being decommissioned and torn apart. When it was being built in Seattle, crews placed a small bottle of MacNaughton Canadian Whisky inside a post on the ship. Since then it’s sailed around the world a couple times and no doubt fought off invasions from New Zealand.

When American workers who built the ship learned it was being torn apart, they notified authorities of the bottle’s location. So if Canadian whisky is your thing, go grab a sip of history.

Houston, we have a drinking problem

Fortunately, NASA has official handlers to bring more enthusiastic booze scientists home.
Fortunately, NASA has official handlers to bring more … enthusiastic booze scientists home.

Japan’s space program may not get as much attention as ours or the Russians’, but, brother, do they have their interstellar priorities straight. And by “straight,” we mean straight whisky.

Japanese distillery Suntory plans to send five kinds of whiskey, as well as a 40% ethanol, to the International Space Station to see how they mature in microgravity. There, the booze will embark on a several year mission to seek out more complicated tones and potentially mellower flavors, to boldly nose like they have not nosed before. NASA officials and Suntory spokespeople did not mention whether they believe exposure to cosmic rays will make the whiskies more fantastic like the Fantastic Four or just become a lot of empty marketing for something ultimately flavorless like the Fantastic Four movies.

The Guys definitely need to book a flight to the ISS soon. According to our reporting all the way back in 2008, Japanese brewery Sapporo has already experimented with hops grown on the station. Put Suntory whisky and Sapporo together, and you’ve got yourself some torpedo bomber shots.

Don’t worry, the alcohol kills the germs

If you’re like the guys, you enjoy a nice glass of whisky, but you’re always in search of the next whisky gimmick. You’ve had shipwreck whisky, whisky aged in barrels at sea, whisky aged in barrels that held some sort of wine, and you’ve even dabbled in flavored whisky.

Enter Whisky by X, the only whisky available today that has been poured over the body of an adult film star. Yes, you buy a bottle of Whisky by X, you don’t just get a quality 12-year-old blend that’s “diamond and gold filtered,” it’s actually run down the body of either Tori Black or Joy Van Velsen (SFW). We’re sure they have distinct tastes. And it’s yours for just $130 a bottle.

Unfortunately, Whisky by X makes no guarantee that it won’t affect your performance the way other whiskies do.

Fill up your glass with British snobbery

Pairing television shows with booze is the latest craze. You may remember the line of beers meant to be enjoyed while watching Game of Thrones. Now, PBS is cashing in on the only hit series they have that wasn’t directed by Ken Burns.

Yes, a Downton Abbey line of wines is in the works. It will use the same vines that made many of the French wines that were popular among the British aristocracy during that time.

They should probably add a whisky, too, so the Irish guy doesn’t feel left out.